Instructional Resources and Learners’ Academic Performance: A Case Study of Boarding Schools in Muhanga District, Rwanda

  • Nyirahabimana Astérie University of Rwanda, College of Education, Rwanda
  • Twagilimana Innocent University of Rwanda, College of Education, Rwanda

Abstract

This article reports on findings of a study carried out to explore the relationship between the instructional resources and learners’ academic performance as the most important component or indicator of quality education. The investigation was mounted by recent developments in instructional resources theories (Janovsky, 2015; The Independent School District 196, 2002; Smith, 1972; Bisiriyu, 2016; Broderick, 1965; Obanya, 1989; Moore and Fitz, 1993). Within a qualitative and quantitative approach and case study methodology, data were collected through analysis of key teaching materials, documentation on learners academic performance of classes and interviews of sample learners. Findings reveal that teachers, the human part of the instructional resources are competent, motivated and qualified to influence learners’academic performance. But, the books and textbooks, field trips, Tools/Equipment and consumables, Graphs, maps/Atlases; just to mention some; as a material part of the instructional resources are not either sufficient or available, neither in numbers nor in variety. It is recommended that more various, sufficient, relevant and effective instructional resources need to be made available to public secondary schools in Rwanda for the effective academic performance of learners. This article reports on findings of a study carried out to explore the relationship between the instructional resources and learners’ academic performance as the most important component or indicator of quality education. The investigation was mounted by recent developments in instructional resources theories. Within a qualitative and quantitative approach methodology, data were collected through analysis of key teaching materials, documentation on learners academic performance and interviews of sample learners. Findings revealed that teachers are competent, motivated and qualified to influence learners’ academic performance. But, books and textbooks are not either sufficient or available. It was recommended that more various, relevant and effective instructional resources need to be made available to public secondary schools in Rwanda for learners effective academic performance.

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Published
2019-09-11
How to Cite
ASTÉRIE, Nyirahabimana; INNOCENT, Twagilimana. Instructional Resources and Learners’ Academic Performance: A Case Study of Boarding Schools in Muhanga District, Rwanda. International Journal of Social Sciences, Humanities and Education, [S.l.], v. 3, n. 3, p. 217-234, sep. 2019. ISSN 2521-0041. Available at: <http://ijsshe.com/index.php/ijsshe/article/view/130>. Date accessed: 19 sep. 2019.
Section
Articles